Brief Answers to the Big Questions – Stephen Hawking

Albert: Overall, I liked this book. True to his word, Hawking never used equations to explain anything, which he claimed would allow any reader to follow what he was saying. Unfortunately, I did not live up to those expectations and definitely didn’t understand everything he said. This was especially true whenever he wrote about his field of expertise (e.g. black holes), as the level of depth and detail would rise dramatically and much of it went over my head. However, I appreciated that he frequently repeated himself, which gave me a second chance to understand. One thing I learned was that scientific determinism, the idea that we can predict the future if we knew everything about the current universe (positions and speeds of all particles), was impossible according to quantum physics, since we cannot know both the speed and location of a particle exactly. This seems to be pretty much accepted in the scientific community, which I hadn’t known before. I also enjoyed how the scientific knowledge was interspersed into his responses to the “big questions,” which had the double effect of making the scientific facts feel more meaningful and giving his answers more weight.

However, there were some minor drawbacks about the book — some of the details about physics weren’t always that interesting, maybe because they were hard to comprehend, and whenever Hawking stepped outside his field to comment on subjects like biology or AI, they tended to be described in much broader and less refined strokes, which I felt was a bit disappointing. Rating: B+

Kevin: This book kind of serves as a popular survey of cosmology, as told by Stephen Hawking, in the context of answering big questions that loom over modern civilization. For the most part, I think I was able to glean some technical understanding of cosmology, which shows how well Hawking could teach these things. One problem was that a lot of explanations were repeated, and this might have been due to the editing, but I actually appreciated this.

I also appreciated the tangibility of Hawking’s ideas and predictions. For example, asking what came before the Big Bang is analogous to asking what’s south of the South Pole, and, according to Hawking, humans must colonize other planets to ensure long-term survival of the species. Finally, I found the afterword written by his daughter, Lucy, to be very touching. Rating: B+

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